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Sponsoring a failed refugee claimant

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wenita View Drop Down
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    Posted: 28 Feb 2011 at 2:43pm
I am a failed refugee claimant and i am ordered to leave Canada before March 18th. My husband and I already submitted our sponsorship application but have not heard back from CIC since. I have heard from many people that it's impossible to get a visitor visa back to be qualified for in-Canada class sponsorship. Now, we are very desparated and depressed. we don't know what to do and the thought of being apart is just killing us.

what would be the reason for the refusal of the visa if I have been very cooperative with the removal order?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RobsLuv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb 2011 at 4:09pm
It wouldn't be a refusal - it would just be that you would be unable to finish the process because your landing interview - to finalize everything - happens within Canada.  If you have to leave the country and you can't get back in again before your application is done processing, you can't land.  Inland landings happen within Canada - outland applicants "land" at the Canadian port of entry after the overseas embassy issues their Confirmation of Permanent Residence.

The inland spousal PR process is supposed to afford protection to people in your situation - as long as your PR application was not submitted after you received an order to leave Canada.  In other words, you can't submit an inland PR application as a last-ditch effort to avoid removal . . . but if you had submitted the application prior to receiving an order to leave, you are supposed to be able to stay until they finalize your application one way or the other. 

Do you have a lawyer?  If not, I strongly recommend that the two of you immediately contact a qualified immigration attorney for a consultation so that you know exactly what you're up against, and how to best navigate the next couple of weeks.  You've no time to waste!

Here's some information from the Inland Spousal Processing Manual, Section 12:
Legal status in Canada
The current Regulations require that to be eligible for the spouse or common-law partner in Canada class, the applicant have temporary legal status in Canada. However, under the spousal policy, persons who are otherwise eligible for consideration under this class (and who are not inadmissible for reasons other than “lack of status”) including those who have applied for consideration on H&C grounds and submitted a sponsorship, may have this requirement waived.  This does not mean however that there is no longer any requirement to have legal status in Canada. Persons who wish to study or work in Canada must still seek to obtain and maintain the required permits. Applicants who do not have legal status in Canada may be removed from Canada at any time.  Other than for lack of status, applicants must not be in any other violation of the Act or Regulations or be subject to a removal order.

Many applicants will benefit from a regulatory stay of removal because they have requested a pre-removal risk assessment (PRRA) or will receive an administrative deferral of removal under the public policy. Many applicants will receive a step-one decision on their case before any further action is taken towards removal from Canada. Further details on “deferral” and “stay of removal” are found in the public policy at Appendix H.

Appendix H—Public Policy Under 25(1) of IRPA to Facilitate Processing in accordance with the Regulations of the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada Class
1. Purpose
The Minister has established a public policy under subsection 25(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), setting the criteria under which spouses and common-law partners of  Canadian citizens and permanent residents in Canada who do not have legal immigration status will be assessed for permanent residence. The objective of this policy is to facilitate family reunification and facilitate processing in cases where spouses and common-law partners are already living together in Canada.
2. Acts and Regulations
IRPA subsections 21(1) (relating to status only) and 25(1); IRP Regulations subsections 124(b) and 72(1)(e)(i) (relating to status only).
3. Policy
CIC is committed to family reunification and facilitating processing in cases of genuine spouses and common-law partners already living together in Canada. CIC is also committed to preventing the hardship resulting from the separation of spouses and common-law partners together in Canada, where possible.  This means that spouses or common-law partners in Canada, regardless of their immigration status, are now able to apply for permanent residence from within Canada in accordance with the same criteria as members of the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class. This facilitative policy applies only to relationships in which undertakings of support have been submitted.  Undertakings are a requirement under this public policy largely because undertakings can be an indication of the applicant’s links with relatives in Canada, which is, in turn, a factor that adds to the degree of hardship involved in the separation of spouses and common-law partners.  Undertakings are also a requirement in the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class.  A25 is being used to facilitate the processing of all genuine out-of-status spouses or common-law partners in the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class where an undertaking has been submitted.  Pending H&C spousal applications with undertakings will also be processed through this class

1. The effect of the policy is to exempt applicants from the requirement under R124(b) to be in status and the requirements under A21(1) and R72(1)(e)(i) to not be inadmissible due to a lack of status; however, all other requirements of the class apply and applicants will be processed based on guidelines in IP2 and IP8. 
Lack of Status
For the purposes of the current public policy only, persons with a “lack of status” refers to those in the following situations:
• persons who have overstayed a visa, visitor record, work permit or student permit;
• persons who have worked or studied without being authorized to do so under the Act;
• persons who have entered Canada without the required visa or other document required under 
   the Regulations;
• persons who have entered Canada without a valid passport or travel document (provided valid
   documents are acquired by the time CIC seeks to grant permanent residence).
NOTE: If a valid passport or travel document is not acquired by the applicant by the time of grant of permanent residence, the applicant may be found inadmissible to Canada. Cases considered under this public policy are not eligible for a passport waiver. Persons seeking this waiver must apply through the regular H&C stream.

As a general rule, CIC should accept only validly issued and non-expired passports for the purposes of the grant of permanent residence in R72. This having been said, the use of a passport which has expired during the processing of an application may be appropriate to fulfill the R72 requirements when no identity issues remain.
“Lack of status” does not refer to any other inadmissibilities including:
• failure to obtain permission to enter Canada after being deported.
• persons who have entered Canada with a fraudulent or improperly obtained passport, travel
   document or visa and who have used the document for misrepresentation under IRPA.
    NOTE: For greater certainty, persons will be excluded from being granted permanent residence
               under this public policy if they used a fraudulent or improperly obtained passport, travel
               document or visa to gain entry to Canada and this document was not surrendered or
               seized upon arrival and the applicant used these fraudulent or improperly obtained
               documents to acquire temporary or permanent resident status.  Other cases may be
               refused for misrepresentation if there is clear evidence of misrepresentation under IRPA in
               accordance with the Department’s guidelines.
• persons under removal orders or facing enforcement proceedings for reasons other than the
   above-noted lack of status reasons.

    NOTE: Most persons who are under a removal order or facing enforcement proceedings are
               eligible for initial consideration under the public policy as they meet the criteria in R124. 
               They cannot however receive a positive final decision or acceptance of their case (i.e.,
               grant of permanent residence) as they will be found inadmissible in the step two
               examination of their case.

Applicants who do not have an undertaking of support submitted by their Canadian citizen or permanent resident spouse or partner do not qualify to be processed under this public policy.  These applicants have to be processed under general H&C provisions, as outlined in IP5, and are  required to demonstrate unusual and undeserved or disproportionate hardship, if required to leave Canada and apply for processing abroad. They also do not benefit from priority processing or other exemptions available in the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class.  The Government of Canada remains vigilant in identifying fraudulent relationships, and identifying those involved in such relationships for enforcement action.
4. Public interest
The Minister has determined that it is in the public interest to assess all foreign nationals, regardless of status (in spousal or common-law relationships with Canadian citizens or permanent residents), under the provisions of the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class if they meet the following conditions:
• Have made an application for permanent residence either on H&C grounds or via the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class;
• Are the subjects of a sponsorship undertaking that is made by their spouse or common-law partner.
          Note: This initial step is only an administrative screening step to determine in which stream 
                    the applicant should be assessed—H&C or in the Spouse or Common-law Partner in
                    Canada class. At this point, officers are not assessing the validity of the sponsorship or
                    the bona fides of the relationship. These assessments will be done under the general
                    provisions of the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class, as outlined in IP2
                    and IP8.  Accordingly, the Minister has decided to use his power under A25 to exempt a
                    foreign national from having to meet the requirements in A21(1) and R72(1)(e)(i), only
                    as they relate to inadmissibility for lack of status (and related documents), and
                    R124(b), so as to enable such foreign nationals to become permanent residents if and
                    only if they meet all other requirements of the Spouse or Common-law Partner in
                    Canada class and are not otherwise inadmissible.
These requirements consist of:
• A determination that the sponsor meets eligibility requirements including having submitted a valid
   sponsorship;
• A bona fide relationship; and
• Cohabitation with the sponsor.
Once applicants are determined to meet these criteria, they are eligible to apply for work and study permits.  Applicants who meet these criteria will be processed as members of the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class and will benefit from all applicable exemptions. This includes  an exemption from the requirement not to be inadmissible on health grounds when there is a risk that their health condition will cause excessive demand (EDE) on health or social services (A38(1) (c)/R1(1)) and the sponsor’s requirement to meet minimum necessary income (also known as LICO). These applicants also have the ability to include family members here and abroad on their applications (concurrent processing).  However, other inadmissibility grounds of IRPA continue to apply. Criminal and security prohibitions are not waived under this public policy, nor is the public health risk assessment. 
5. Procedures
A. APPLICATIONS:
i. Previously refused applications
Because the legal principle of functus officio does not permit the Department, in the present context, to revisit finalized applications, this change is not retroactive; therefore, foreign nationals  previously refused under H&C or in the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class will have
to reapply in the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class. These applicants will be required to pay the appropriate processing fee.
ii. H&C assessments not completed prior to removal
Cases involving spouses or common-law partners in which the H&C assessment was not completed prior to removal (i.e. the foreign national partner is now overseas awaiting a final H&C decision), will also be facilitated in a manner consistent with this policy intent. In these situations, as long as a valid undertaking has been submitted (voluntarily or in response to a CIC request), the case will fall under this public policy: the existence of a marriage or common-law relationship will be a determinative hardship factor.  In cases where undertakings have not been submitted, officers should contact the applicant, inform of the existence of this public policy, and provide an opportunity for the applicant to have a sponsorship submitted by the sponsor.  For cases accepted under this public policy, officers should follow procedures in IP5 – 14.5 – Process for positive H&C decision after removal.
iii. Pending applications (received prior to February 18, 2005)
This public policy applies to all pending spousal applications that meet the criteria, both H&C and
applications in the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class. This includes applications
for which the assessment has not yet started and all applications where the refusal letter has not
yet been sent out, whether at the CPC-Vegreville or at any of the regional offices. No additional
fees are required to assess existing cases under the provisions of the public policy.
H&C
In order for an application to be processed under this public policy, the person must have
made an application pursuant to subsection 25(1) of IRPA and have submitted an
undertaking. Pursuant to section 66 of the Regulations, the application must be made in
writing and accompanied by an application to remain in Canada as a permanent resident.
Applicants in Canada will have submitted their application using the form IMM 5001.
Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class
Pending applications made under the provisions of the Spouse or Common-law Partner in
Canada class in which the applicant does not have valid immigration status will also be
eligible for this public policy. In these cases, provided the applicant meets all other
provisions of the class, requirements of status in A21(1), R124(b), and R72(1)(e)(i) will be
waived through the public policy by A25(1). No additional H&C application is required.
iv. New applications (received on or after February 18, 2005)
New spousal applicants, whether with valid immigration status or without status, are
instructed to apply using the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class application kit if
they meet the criteria for this public policy and wish to be considered under this policy. In cases
where spousal applicants do not meet the criteria, they will be instructed to apply in the regular
H&C stream.
In cases where spouses mistakenly apply using the H&C kit, provisions of this public policy will
apply as long as applicants meet the criteria (including a valid sponsorship) and confirm that they
wish to have their applications assessed under the provisions of the Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class. Please see the section entitled Appendix: Case Type List for
Application of the Public Policy for a summary of case types and associated guidelines.
F. ADMINISTRATIVE DEFERRAL OF REMOVAL
The Canada Border Services Agency has agreed to grant a temporary administrative deferral ofremoval to applicants who qualify under this public policy. The deferral will not be granted to applicants who:
• Are inadmissible for security (A34), human or international rights violations (A35), serious criminality and criminality (A36), or organized criminality (A37);
• Are excluded by the Refugee Protection Division under Article F of the Geneva Convention;
• Have charges pending or in those cases where charges have been laid but dropped by the 
   Crown, if these charges were dropped to effect a removal order;
* Have already benefited from an administrative deferral of removal emanating from an H&Cspousal
   application;
• Have a warrant outstanding for removal;
• Have previously hindered or delayed removal; and
• Have been previously deported from Canada and have not obtained permission to return.

For those applicants who are receiving a pre-removal risk assessment (PRRA), the administrative deferral for processing applicants under this H&C public policy will be in effect for the time required to complete the PRRA (R232). Applicants who have waived a PRRA or who are not entitled to a PRRA will receive an administrative deferral of removal of 60 days.  Applicants who apply under this public policy after they are deemed removal ready by CBSA will not benefit from the administrative deferral of removal except in the limited circumstances outlined below (transitional cases).
When is a client removal ready?
For the purposes of this public policy, by the time an applicant attends a pre-removal interview,he/she is generally removal ready. This means that a client who has been called to a pre-removalinterview by any means (letter, call etc.) and who has not already applied as a spousal H&C  applicant or a Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class applicant, cannot, from the pointthey are called to the interview forward, benefit from an administrative deferral of removal asoutlined in this public policy except in the limited circumstances outlined below (transitional cases).  As is the case now, clients with a pending H&C application who are removed from Canada whiletheir application is being considered will be able to return to Canada if a positive decision isrendered.



Edited by RobsLuv - 28 Feb 2011 at 5:01pm
3/2007-applied
1/2008-Refused
12/2008-ADR failed
1/2010-Appeal allowed
4/2010-In Process(Again)
5/2010-request FBI/meds
8/2010-FBI recd
11/30/10-APPROVED!
1/31/11-LANDED!
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wenita View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wenita Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb 2011 at 4:47pm
We cannot afford a lawyer.. we are both 19 and my husband is still in collage. We intend to apply from outside canada if I cannot get a visa to come back but 18 months of processing time means being apart from each other and that just killing us. all we want is to be together and if the worse happened he would leave his live here in canada to go live with me in a country that speak language he cannot understand.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RobsLuv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb 2011 at 5:11pm
Originally posted by wenita wenita wrote:

We cannot afford a lawyer.. we are both 19 and my husband is still in collage. We intend to apply from outside canada if I cannot get a visa to come back but 18 months of processing time means being apart from each other and that just killing us. all we want is to be together and if the worse happened he would leave his live here in canada to go live with me in a country that speak language he cannot understand.
  There are some really good lawyers who will consult with you for a nominal fee.  I think it would be a really good idea to at least know where you stand and what your options are so that you can proceed in the right direction.  Not knowing what to expect as far as a consequence to any action - whether that be to stay or to leave - is not in your best interest, and can only delay the eventual outcome that much more.  If you allow yourself to play the victim, they will victimize you.  If you don't want him to have to leave his life here in Canada and go to a country where they speak a language he doesn't understand, then do what you can now - no matter what it takes - to ensure that you don't back yourselves into that corner.  There is a right way and a wrong way to go about this, but you're fighting bureaucratic gobble-de-goop (read above) that is way over the heads of most people who aren't lawyers.  How on earth are you supposed to wade through all that [email protected] by yourself and take action that protects your relationship?? 

You haven't given us much information at all as to how you came to be in Canada, how long you've been here, what has happened so far in regards to your refugee case, how long ago you submitted the spousal PR ap, and whether or not you were under a removal order at the time - SO it makes it really hard to even begin to figure out what options might be available to you.  I know it's frustrating - but as I said, you can either be a CIC victim, or you can get informed about your options so you can make the best decisions on behalf of yourself and your relationship.  Applying outland is certainly an option, but you will - at the very least - want to know what your departure from Canada does to you as far as having to maybe apply for Authorization to Return before you can be approved outland for PR.  And don't forget - your spouse will need to withdraw the inland ap if you're going to apply outland.  Also - the bolded info in my post above has information about inland applicant and consideration if they're removed from Canada that needs to be deciphered, too.


Edited by RobsLuv - 28 Feb 2011 at 5:14pm
3/2007-applied
1/2008-Refused
12/2008-ADR failed
1/2010-Appeal allowed
4/2010-In Process(Again)
5/2010-request FBI/meds
8/2010-FBI recd
11/30/10-APPROVED!
1/31/11-LANDED!
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wenita View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wenita Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb 2011 at 5:26pm
I came to Canada in May 2007 as a student. In 2009, my mum made me apply as a refugee. the application was denied. In June 2010, my husband and I got married but we needed to wait 3 months until we could get a marriage certificate. We were called in to be offered PRRA application on July 12. the sponsorship application was ready and was sent on Sept 7th and we have not heard back from them since. there was no letter saying they have recieved it or anything. we have been very worried. and we were called in again on Feb 12th 2011. the PRRA was refused and i was given 1 month to leave Canada. I am going in tomorrow (March 1st) to get an approval of my plane ticket that i volunteered to get myself. I am supposed to be leaving on March 15th.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RobsLuv Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Feb 2011 at 8:33pm
Again - you submitted an inland PR application prior to your PRRA being refused!!  They are well aware that inland PR applications are not looked at for 9-10 months after receipt - AND that you won't even get confirmation of receipt from CPC-Vegreville.  But - do you have proof that you mailed it?  That it was received prior to your hearing on Feb 12th?  Proof that you paid the immigration application fees?  If so, I think you are protected from being removed until a decision can be made on your spousal PR application!!!  This is where it's valuable to get a lawyer's opinion!  If you are in Ontario, I can recommend a very good lawyer who will only charge you $150 for a 30 minute consultation (at least that was his rate a couple of years ago).  But he is knowledgeable and fair and compassionate.  Is there nobody you can borrow a couple hundred dollars from???

You have to understand - CBSA is handling your removal.  They are not CIC!!  They are not going to do you any favours.  Please, at least try to find someone who can advocate for you - even if your husband gets in touch with his Member of Parliament.  Some of them are very critical of CBSA and CIC and they will help - others really don't care.  So it's the luck of the draw - but isn't it worth it to try to make some noise??  You were a kid - now you are a married woman with a husband who is a Canadian.  If it's a genuine relationship, you're eligible to be sponsored for permanent status.  Don't let them just take that away from you because you don't know (yet) how to fight it.  You could seriously end up in a situation where you have to apply for an Authorization to Return to Canada before you can even be approved for PR - which will significantly lengthen your PR process.  And it would be a real shame to have to do that if you really are NOT obligated to leave! 
3/2007-applied
1/2008-Refused
12/2008-ADR failed
1/2010-Appeal allowed
4/2010-In Process(Again)
5/2010-request FBI/meds
8/2010-FBI recd
11/30/10-APPROVED!
1/31/11-LANDED!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dpenabill Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Mar 2011 at 8:40am
I strongly concur in the advice to see a lawyer forthwith, borrowing the money, selling one's television and whatever else (legally of course) is necessary to get enough money.

Why? This is complicated. There are various ways these matters may be approached. An H & C application, for example, may be available. An appeal of the PRRA refusal may be available. I do not know if these or other recourses are feasible in your circumstances but it does appear that you are not eligible for deferral policy -- though here too I am not sure ... but ...

Why it appears to me you are indeed not eligible for the deferral:
It appears to me that the July 2010 meeting may have been the pre-removal interview. I am not at all sure of this, but if that was the pre-removal interview, and the application for PR was submitted after that (Sept 2010), you are not eligible for an administrative deferral of removal under the policy providing deferrals for those with inland spousal sponsored PR applications pending. (Reason: you were "removal ready" prior to submitting the application for PR.)

A lawyer could look at your paperwork and determine whether this is the case or not (depends on what your "removal ready" date was), and in any event could explain what remedies/recourse is available, what is not available.

Not being eligible for the deferral does not, in itself, make you ineligible for an inland sponsored PR. As RobsLuv says, and I think this is right, one side of this is CBSA and is about deportation, while the other side is CIC; so if there are appeals or such that can delay the actual removal/deportation from Canada (CBSA side), I believe the inland sponsored PR app may still proceed (CIC side) ... again, a lawyer can confirm this or not, and a lawyer can help pursue whatever remedies there might be available for avoiding or at least delaying actual removal/deportation (or give you the bad news and allow you to focus on what to do in that scenario).

I disagree some with RobsLuv about the impact of leaving Canada on the inland sponsored PR application. Yes, one must be in Canada to land, but that is not the primary disability that results from having to leave Canada. To be eligible under the inland sponsored PR application process, the applicant must be living with the sponsor IN CANADA and as soon as the applicant is no longer living the sponsor in Canada the applicant is not eligible pursuant to the inland process. I don't think this makes much of a difference in your case. If you get to stay in Canada (and I believe this is true even if it is not pursuant to the formal deferral policy, though again see a lawyer to be sure), your sponsored PR app can proceed. If you must leave, you are right, you will have to start over with an out of Canada application.

But time is running out. Get to a lawyer as soon as possible.

RobsLuv:
Quote ... you submitted an inland PR application prior to your PRRA being refused


I do not think that is the critical point in time; it is when the FN is "removal ready." It seems to me that there had been a lot of confusion about this in the past, and that appendix H addresses most of the variations in factual circumstances in much detail toward resolving a lot of those confusions.

Quote For the purposes of this public policy, by the time an applicant attends a pre-removal interview, he/she is generally removal ready. This means that a client who has been called to a pre-removal interview by any means (letter, call etc.) and who has not already applied as a spousal H&C applicant or a Spouse or Common-law Partner in Canada class applicant, cannot, from the point they are called to the interview forward, benefit from an administrative deferral of removal as outlined in this public policy


The question is whether or not the July 2010 meeting (before inland app submitted) was the "pre-removal interview" or whether the Feb 2011 meeting (after inland app submitted) was the "pre-removal interview" ... OP really needs to have a lawyer sort through the particulars.


Edited by dpenabill - 01 Mar 2011 at 8:55am
Bureaucracy is what bureaucracy does, or When in doubt, follow the instructions. Otherwise, follow the instructions.



BTW: Not an expert, not a Can. lawyer, never worked in immigration
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wenita Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Mar 2011 at 9:41pm
I went to the meeting today to get an approval of my plane ticket. I will be leaving as planned..
and I had a confirmation that I will need an ARC to return since my departure order has become an deportation order since I didn't leave within 30 days of the day i recieved my negative refugee decision (I had absolutely no idea that I was required to leave, my mum kept all the doc and never told me a thing. I would def leave if i knew i was supposed to.. too late now Cry)

my question is..

Should I apply for ARC before we submit the out land application?

and

my husband is willing to come with me as soon as he's done school and stay with me as long as it take to get PR  (in Thailand is 18 months) then should we state in the application that we CURRENTLY live together? his status will only be a non-immigrant who gains entry using marriage visa. would that be considered living together?

and would that prove that our relationship is real if we have been living together in Canada and he follows me to Thailand to live together while the application is being processed?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote king125 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Mar 2011 at 11:40am
Why would anyone from Thailand apply for refugee, I have lived there and it one of the most open and democratic in South East Asia. If you were from Laos or Myanmar and  Karen Hill or Humog, I could understand, but Thai
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Fran Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Sep 2012 at 10:33am
Hello...I hope somebody can giveme some advise in my case, as it follows....


Applied as a refugee...denied...
PRRA denied....
by the time I met the love of my life....
In my job they decided sponsor me...left Canada and I went to Mexico....unescorted/ no criminality.....
My partner and I decided to keep the relation, because the paralegal advise it was easy for me to go back!.....
After months of waiting, they didnt grant me a ARC....

My partner and I decided to get married in Mexico city, it is genuine relationship.... We have gone througha lot in the past year....he came to see me several times in LA and now in Mexico city....we have plenty of proof to show them that is a marriage for love....

My question is, how much probabilities, do I have to go back?.....as I read above, Im not sure the public policy is gonna help us!.....the paralegal says is 100% that i can go back, but at this point I dont know what to believe?....

Please help!!!.....
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